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Reports and Stats

 

Reports and Stats

Domestic Violence is one of the leading causes of family homelessness nationwide. In New York City, more than 30% of homeless families are headed by victims of domestic abuse.

Reports and Stats


Prioritizing Homeless Children and Their Families

Nearly 70% of the people in the City’s shelter system are children and their families, many of whom had been in the shelter system for over a year. These numbers and the research on the impact that homelessness has on children, led Citizens’ Committee for Children (CCC), Enterprise Community Partners (Enterprise), and New Destiny Housing (New Destiny) to convene the Family Homelessness Task Force (FHTF). The FHTF is a group of stakeholders from over 40 organizations which came together to call more attention to the needs of homeless children and their families and to develop and advance recommendations to prevent and end family homelessness, while ensuring the well-being of families living in shelter.


Out in the Cold: Housing Cuts Leave DV Survivors with No Place to Go

New York City’s domestic violence victims often use temporary shelters in their attempts to escape abuse and ensure their children’s safety. But, what happens to them at the end of their stay? Out in the Cold, a report prepared by New Destiny Housing Corporation, examines the ability of domestic violence shelter residents to obtain permanent housing, and how the elimination of the Advantage subsidy program has put them at serious risk for homelessness and continued violence.


Closing Doors: Eroding Housing Options, Dangerous Outcomes

The report compared a three-month period—October through December—in 2009 and 2010 to see the impact of declining subsidy options for domestic violence (DV) survivors using shelter. The report examines how the changes in New York City’s homeless re-housing policy implemented in Fall 2010, in combination with a time limited length of stay in DV shelters, affected the ability of DV shelter residents to achieve housing permanency after leaving shelter. The study findings show that the reduction of housing subsidy options and the almost complete reliance upon employment as the path to housing stability resulted in a larger number of DV shelter residents leaving without permanent housing or with unstable and unsafe housing. Only 11% of emergency shelter residents were able to obtain permanent housing by then end of their shelter stays.


Domestic Violence Emergency Shelter Outcomes since the Elimination of Advantage: Key Findings

The report highlights the impact of the City’s elimination of the Advantage rental assistance program in March 2011 on the housing outcomes of domestic violence emergency shelter residents. New Destiny found that there was an increase in the number of residents leaving shelter for less stable housing and unknown destinations.


Outcomes of Domestic Violence Shelter Stays, Fiscal Year 2010

The report provides an overview of key findings from Coalition survey data on the outcomes and profile of domestic violence shelter residents exiting shelter from July 2009 to June 2010, prior to the August 2010 elimination of DV Advantage, a rental subsidy for survivors of domestic violence.


NYCHA and Section 8 DV Priority Applications

The report summarizes key findings from Coalition survey data collected from domestic violence shelters in 2009, tracking the impact of the April 2006 changes to the domestic violence documentation requirements for the domestic violence priority for NYCHA Public Housing and Section 8 assistance.


CY 2009 Summary DV Shelter Discharge Data

The data provide an overview of the destinations of residents discharged from the domestic violence shelter system during calendar year 2009.


Length of Stay Report

The report, based on data collected from 38 New York City domestic violence shelters during calendar year 2008, examines the relationship between the length of stay in emergency domestic violence shelters and the housing destinations of shelter residents upon discharge. The report found that longer stays resulted in improved housing outcomes for shelter residents.


Outcomes of Domestic Violence Shelter Stays since Launch of DV Advantage

The data in the report represent a summary of the findings from the Coalition surveys from November 2007 through January 2008, when DV Advantage launched, as compared to findings during the same period last year when the Housing Stability Plus (HSP) program was still in operation.


Outcomes of Domestic Violence Shelter Stays Since Launch of Housing Stability Plus (HSP)

The report analyzes data collected from domestic violence shelters from April through July 2005. A restructured survey format allowed New Destiny to collect and analyze information about where women are going upon leaving shelter and how the HSP program affected the permanent housing placements of women in the emergency shelter system.


Discharge Destinations and Types of Housing 2004-2009

The report summarizes the destinations and housing outcomes of residents discharged from domestic violence shelters from 2004-2009, through the lens of the different rental subsidies available, including HSP and Advantage, at various points throughout this period.


On the Verge of Homelessness: The Impact of DPE Discharges on Domestic Violence Survivors (August 2004)

The report summarizes key findings from 101 interviews conducted with domestic violence survivors during the summers of 2003 and 2004, focusing on the anticipated destinations of residents who had reached or were nearing the end of their maximum 135-day in the emergency domestic violence shelter system.

 

Domestic violence is a leading cause of
homelessness for women & children
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